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  1. Allergy Pill Allegra to Be Sold Over the Counter

    In time for spring allergy season, the FDA today approved over-the-counter sale of Allegra, a best-selling antihistamine also sold under the generic name fexofenadine.

  2. FDA Approves New Head Lice Treatment

    The FDA has approved a new treatment for controlling head lice, called Natroba Topical Suspension 0.9%, and says the substance can be safely used for infestations in children as young as age 4, as well as in older youths and adults.

  3. Gardasil Approved for Anal Cancer Prevention

    The FDA today approved the Gardasil vaccine against sexually transmitted HPV for preventing anal cancer in both males and females. Routine HPV vaccination is recommended for girls but optional for boys.

  4. Lipitor Recall Grows by 19,000 Bottles

    The Lipitor recall continues with Pfizer's recall of another 19,000 bottles of the popular cholesterol drug. A musty smell has led to four recalls totaling 345,000 bottles since August 2010.

  5. Cough Medicine That Looks Like Candy Gets FDA Warning

    Warning that the prescription cough medicine benzonatate has a “candy-like appearance” that may attract children, the FDA says it is stiffening the drug’s warning label to prevent accidental ingestion, which can and has caused death.

  6. Benadryl and Motrin for Kids Recalled

    Johnson & Johnson says it has ordered a voluntary recall of about 4.8 million packages of children’s medicines due to “insufficiencies” in the manufacturing process.

  7. Osteoporosis Drug Approved for Cancer-Related Bone Pain

    The FDA has approved Xgeva, an osteoporosis drug reformulated to reduce the risk of bone fractures and bone pain in patients with cancer that has spread throughout the body.

  8. Darvon, Darvocet Banned

    The FDA today banned Darvon, Darvocet, and other pills containing propoxyphene -- a safety-plagued opioiod painkiller from the 1950s. New proof of heart side effects finally doomed the drug.

  9. Egrifta Approved for HIV-Related Lipodystrophy

    The FDA has approved Egrifta, administered by daily injection, for the treatment of HIV lipodystrophy -- fat accumulation that is a side effect of AIDS drugs.

  10. FDA Approves Cymbalta for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    A drug used to treat depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, and diabetic neuropathy has been approved by the FDA for a new use -- to treat chronic musculoskeletal pain, including pain caused by osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain.

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